Published On: Wed, Nov 1st, 2023

Gertrude Fiske | An American Impressionist Artist


 

Gertrude Fiske | An American Impressionist Artist

Gertrude Horsford Fiske (1879-1961) remains an iconic American artist celebrated for her incredible talents as a figure painter, still life artist, and landscape virtuoso. Emerging during the early 20th century, Fiske was an integral part of the esteemed Boston School of painters, solidifying her place in art history. Notably, in 1929, she broke the mold by becoming the very first woman appointed to the Massachusetts State Art Commission.

Her early years were set in the vibrant city of Boston, where she was the daughter of a prominent local lawyer. Before embarking on her artistic journey, Fiske’s life took an interesting turn, leading her down a path of success as a professional golfer.

Around 1904, Fiske took a decisive step in her life, enrolling at the Boston Museum School, a pivotal moment that marked the beginning of her artistic odyssey. Here, she had the privilege of studying under the guidance of esteemed artists like Edmund C. Tarbell, Frank Benson, and Philip Hale. In addition to her time at the Boston Museum School, she also sought artistic wisdom from Charles H. Woodbury in Ogunquit, Maine, whose advice to “paint in verbs, not in nouns” profoundly influenced her early work. However, it is important to note that her artistic journey would take her in various exciting directions.

Fiske’s impact on the art world extended beyond her individual work. In 1914, she played a pivotal role in the formation of the Guild of Boston Artists, a testament to her dedication to nurturing and advancing the arts. In 1917, she was instrumental in establishing the Boston Society of Etchers. By the mid-1920s, she had firmly established herself as a respected and accomplished painter.

What set Fiske apart from her peers was her unique approach to art. Her portrayals of women in traditional settings showcased them with strength and authority, a stark contrast to the common portrayal of women during that era. Fiske’s compositions often featured both men and women, utilizing bold colors to create compelling pieces. She was highly respected for her exceptional ability to capture the essence of male artists in her work. Fiske’s artistic range also included landscapes, each painting telling a story of its own. Her subjects ranged from Revere Beach and a stone quarry in Weston, Massachusetts, to the Navy Yard in Portsmouth, New Hampshire. As her career progressed, she incorporated modern technologies, such as telephones and automobiles, into her art.

Some of her noteworthy works included “The Window” (1916), “The Carpenter” (c. 1922), “Sunday Afternoon” (c. 1925), and “Jade” (c. 1930). Her unique sense of composition was celebrated for its harmony and warmth, with “The Carpenter” even earning the prestigious Thomas B. Clarke prize from the National Academy of Design.

Fiske’s artwork made its way to esteemed exhibitions, including those at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, the Art Institute of Chicago, the National Academy of Design, the Corcoran Gallery, Cleveland Museum of Art, the Farnsworth Museum, the Rhode Island School of Design, and the Guild of Boston Artists. She received recognition through awards such as the Shaw Prize for women artists (twice) and the Proctor Prize for portraiture from the National Academy of Design.

In 2018, Gertrude Fiske’s remarkable body of work took center stage at the exhibition “Gertrude Fiske: American Master,” which was held at Discover Portsmouth, Portsmouth, New Hampshire. The show was expertly organized by the Portsmouth Historical Society and curated by Lainey McCartney. According to McCartney, Fiske’s extraordinary talent, dignity, and unrelenting work ethic challenged conventional gender roles and expectations of her time. She blazed a trail for future female artists by forging her path in a period when traditional norms held sway.

In 1961, Gertrude Fiske passed away in Weston, Massachusetts, leaving behind a legacy of artistic excellence that continues to inspire and captivate art enthusiasts to this day.

regarding the mandatory POSH compliance trainings. We need to confirm the dates and timings of two sessions of the training (One for IC members and one for all the employees). These trainings should be conducted before the end of this year. Kindly confirm the timings of the same so that we can update all the employees, POSH IC members and TMF about the same.

Gertrude Fiske | An American Impressionist Artist

Gertrude Fiske | An American Impressionist Artist

Gertrude Fiske | An American Impressionist Artist

Gertrude Fiske | An American Impressionist Artist

Gertrude Fiske | An American Impressionist Artist

Gertrude Fiske | An American Impressionist Artist

Gertrude Fiske | An American Impressionist Artist

Gertrude Fiske | An American Impressionist Artist

Gertrude Fiske | An American Impressionist Artist

Gertrude Fiske | An American Impressionist Artist

Gertrude Fiske | An American Impressionist Artist

Gertrude Fiske | An American Impressionist Artist

Gertrude Fiske | An American Impressionist Artist

Gertrude Fiske | An American Impressionist Artist

Gertrude Fiske | An American Impressionist Artist

Gertrude Fiske | An American Impressionist Artist

Gertrude Fiske | An American Impressionist Artist

Gertrude Fiske | An American Impressionist Artist

Gertrude Fiske | An American Impressionist Artist

Gertrude Fiske | An American Impressionist Artist

Gertrude Fiske | An American Impressionist Artist

Gertrude Fiske | An American Impressionist Artist

Gertrude Fiske | An American Impressionist Artist

Gertrude Fiske | An American Impressionist Artist

Gertrude Fiske | An American Impressionist Artist

Gertrude Fiske | An American Impressionist Artist





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